Sunday, June 23, 2013

Wall Street Journal Blames the VA Backlog on Veterans "Gaming The System"



True of False: Veterans reapplying for increases are scamming the system?

According to this , veterans applying for an increase are guilty scammers - mostly with minor injuries that should not count. This is the second similar article I've seen recently. Where the hell are they finding these guys?
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324688404578541540407691684.html


I really do not know what to say about this except consider the source. The Wall Street Journal would like you to believe these are welfare type entitlements and that it is more of the big govt socialist programs they so loathe.

What they fail to realize it is a expense that has been incurred from 3 wars Desert Storm, OEF, OIF that have protected Wall Streets financial and geopolitical interests that American business has profited from over last 20 plus years. Less than one percent of Americans are veterans. They have paid the price of freedom with there bodies, minds and lives. They volunteered to protect our way of life for the 99 percent. We owe them the healthcare and compensation for their injuries. It is a sacred oath we as a nation need to uphold for those who stood in harms way to protect our nation. Blaming veterans who have are suffering disabilities for the rest of their lives as a consequence of serving our nation is lower than low.  It shows a very naive understanding of the price of armed conflict.  Mr. Reporter and Editor of the Wall Street Journal why don't you come down to a DAV or VFW meeting or better yet a VA Hospital and voice your opinion in person. Do you have the intestinal fortitude to call us scammers to our faces. My next appointment is July 10th at the Buffalo VA hope to see you there.

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 Sean Eagan

 Life Member VFW NY Post 53 American Cold War Veterans, Inc.

Web: http://americancoldwarvets.org/
Blog: Cold War Veterans Blog
Email: Sean.Eagan@gmail.com
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